Aves Optometrists

Painless Eye Examination

Our eye examination costs £35.00 (unless eligible for an NHS examination) and our appointments are set 40 mins apart (for adults) to allow sufficient time for each patient.

When you attend your eye examination you will be taken to a room full of equipment. To the first-timer this can be daunting, but there really is nothing to worry about. The equipment used is safe and does not cause any pain, although there may be mild discomfort when your Optometrist uses very bright lights.  Think of it as a room full of special cameras and magnifying glasses that the Optometrists will use to take a good close up look of your eyes. To those who have previously attended an eye examination you may find the information below of interest as we explain the processes involved in an eye examination.

History and Symptoms

When the eye examination starts, the Optometrist will ask you a series of questions to determine if you are having any problems with your eyes and also if there are any eye conditions in the family which may be hereditary. This is the time to bring up any worries you have about your eyes or vision. You will also be asked about your general health and any medication you may be taking, and your occupation and visual needs.

Examination of the eye.

This is where the Optometrist will examine both the inside structures and the outside of your eyes. You are asked to look in different directions and the Optometrist will shine a light sometimes while holding the eyelids. This checks the health of the eyes and also gives a valuable insight into your general health.

Visual Acuity

SnellenThis is the measure of the eye’s ability to see objects at a certain distance. Someone who has “normal/perfect” vision is referred to as having ‘6/6 Vision’ (or 20/20 in America). The Visual Acuity is normally measured with a Snellen Chart which the Optometrist will ask you to read.  Don’t feel embarrassed when you get to the letters that are out of focus and don’t squint. The more honest you are about what you see, the more the Optometrist will  be able to help you.  For people who can’t read or for small children, pictures or symbols can be used.

Pupil function

TCPRO_Clinical_ImagesThe Optometrists will also inspect your pupils. They will be looking for equal size and how they react.

 

 

 

Refraction

This is where the Optometrist finds the best lenses to correct your vision (your Prescription). Please remember that there is never a ‘wrong’ or ‘right’ answer and the Optometrist continually checks your responses. It is normal for your vision to be blurred some of the time during an Eye Examination.

Other methods

Other types of examination may be used by the Optometrist including Ocular motility,visual field testingintraocular pressure and retinal photography. Sometimes eye drops are used as part of the examination. This may blur your vision temporarily but your Optometrists will discuss this with you first. The necessary tests can vary widely from one year to the next so do not be surprised if the length of the test varies.

TCPRO_Fix_Disp Single_fish

 

After the examination

The Optometrist will talk to you about whether you need spectacles or contact lenses or no correction at all. Sometimes you could be referred on to your GP or local hospital for further tests.

If you need spectacles, our Dispensing Opticians will guide you and give you as much help choosing your frames and lenses as you require.